Posts Tagged ‘repubblica’

 

 

Giuseppe D’Avanzo, a great Italian journalist has left us today.

I had the fortune of meeting D’Avanzo once in late 2006, shortly after the height of what is known in Italy as “Nigergate,” a scandal that put the country right in the middle of what the United States were going through at the time with the so-called “Plamegate.”

D’Avanzo, alongside Repubblica colleague Carlo Bonini, was able to dig through the thick and intricate web of lies and deceitful acts the Italian government of Berlusconi accomplished to help out George W. Bush gather information for his campaign to start a war against Saddam Hussein’s Iraq.

D’Avanzo simply did what all journalists should do: He followed the facts.

What he found out was that a robbery at the Niger embassy in Rome on New Year’s of 2001 led to the disappearance of official stamps and letterheads… and that led to many other suspicious details. Continue Reading »

Silvio Berlusconi loves to joke around.

He probably thought he was really funny today, too, when he criticized unspecified studies on press freedom that place Italy in a pretty low position. (I have reason to believe it’s Freedom House’s Map of Press Freedom, where Italy is the only western European country, alongside Northern Ireland, classified as “partly free.”)

“If there’s one thing we know, it’s that Italy has too much press freedom. That is an undisputable fact,” he said in between chuckles during an official press conference.

He loves press freedom and freedom of speech so much he’s making sure journalists stay free by suing them for enormous amounts of money.
Continue Reading »

It looks like Italy’s prime minister Silvio Berlusconi is losing it. And by ‘it’ I mean both his poise and the confidence of his voters, given the reports of a large chunk of his electorate not wanting to show up in the upcoming regional elections on March 28 and 29.

In the next few days I will be talking about the latest scandal involving Berlusconi and how the media is starting to unveil a network of influence that the prime minister holds over some of the most important and vital elements of Italian democracy.


Continue Reading »